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Friday, July 24, 2020 | History

2 edition of Conflict and adolescent autonomy among Chinese-Canadian immigrant mother-child dyads found in the catalog.

Conflict and adolescent autonomy among Chinese-Canadian immigrant mother-child dyads

Christine Yvette Tardif

Conflict and adolescent autonomy among Chinese-Canadian immigrant mother-child dyads

an intracultural study of the influence of acculturation disparity

by Christine Yvette Tardif

  • 245 Want to read
  • 39 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Parent and teenager -- Ontario -- Toronto -- Cross-cultural studies.,
  • Mother and child -- Ontario -- Toronto -- Cross-cultural studies.,
  • Conflict of generations -- Ontario -- Toronto -- Cross-cultural studies.,
  • Acculturation -- Ontario -- Toronto -- Cross-cultural studies.,
  • Chinese -- Ontario -- Toronto.,
  • Children of immigrants -- Ontario -- Toronto -- Cross-cultural studies.,
  • Autonomy in adolescence -- Ontario -- Toronto -- Cross-cultural studies.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Christine Yvette Tardif.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination xiv, 247 leaves :
    Number of Pages247
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL19110312M
    ISBN 100612847381

    Low income immigrant Chinese families in British Columbia: Demographic profile and links with mental health. Paper presented at the National Metropolis Conference, Ottawa, Ontario. Chance, L. J. & Costigan, C.L. (Oct. ). Gender differences in level and patterns of symptom endorsement among immigrant Chinese Canadian adolescents and ://~ifslab/?q=node/ Cambridge Core - Developmental Psychology - Child, Adolescent and Family Development - by Phillip T. Slee

      Child-rearing strategies and caregiver-infant interaction among Chinese Canadian and European Canadian mothers: A cross-cultural study. Poster presented at the 12th World congress of the World Association for Infant Mental Health, Leipzig, ://   C.Y. Tardif, E. GevaThe link between acculturation disparity and conflict among Chinese-Canadian immigrant mother–adolescent dyads Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 37 (), pp. Google Scholar

    Among a diverse sample of Latino-origin parent–adolescent dyads in Houston, Texas, this study examines how parents’ cultural orientations are associated directly and indirectly, through parental beliefs, with parenting practices giving youth behavioral autonomy and ://   The nature of adolescent–parent relationships has been a topic of enduring concern in developmental science. In this article, we review theory and current research on several central topics. First, we define adolescence as a developmental period and briefly discuss current theoretical and analytical approaches. Then, we consider adolescent–parent relationship quality, including


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Conflict and adolescent autonomy among Chinese-Canadian immigrant mother-child dyads by Christine Yvette Tardif Download PDF EPUB FB2

Participants included Chinese Canadian immigrant and 30 Anglo-Canadian mothers and their children living in Toronto, Canada. Self-reports of mothers' and adolescents' acculturation and perceptions of conflict in the mother-adolescent relationship and mothers' responses to vignettes depicting adolescent misbehavior were :// The Link between Acculturation Disparity and Conflict among Chinese Canadian Immigrant Mother-Adolescent Dyads Article in Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology This study examined mother–child acculturation gaps in relationship to youth distress and the possible mediating role of parent–child conflict and parenting style in a sample of 81 Chinese American families.

Hierarchical multiple regression analyses provided partial support for a relationship between acculturation gaps and youth ://,-Intergenerational-Conflict.

Christine Y. Tardif, Esther Geva, The Link between Acculturation Disparity and Conflict among Chinese Canadian Immigrant Mother-Adolescent Dyads, Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, /, 37, 2, (), (). This study examined whether parent–child conflict and cohesion during adolescence vary among families characterized as having different cultural traditions regarding parental authority and individual autonomy.

Approximately 1, American adolescents from immigrant and native-born families with Mexican, Chinese, Filipino, and European backgrounds reported on their beliefs, expectations, and Relations between parent-child acculturation differences and adjustment within immigrant Chinese families.

Child Development ). Tridimensional acculturation and adaptation among Jamaican adolescent–mother dyads in the United States. disparity and conflict among Chinese Canadian immigrant mother-adolescent dyads. Journal of Cross Prinz RJ, Foster SL, Kent RN, O'Leary KD.

Multivariate assessment of conflict in distressed and nondistressed mother–adolescent dyads. Journal of Applied Behavioral Analysis. ; 1 – [PMC free article] Qin DB. “Our child doesn't talk to us anymore”: Alienation in immigrant Chinese families. Anthropology & Education :// This study investigated the differences and similarities in child‐rearing practices among Chinese, immigrant Chinese, and Caucasian‐American parents.

The subjects of this study were the mothers and fathers of children enrolled in kindergarten, first grade, and In our previous study of mother-child stress and adjustment in Arab Muslim immigrant families, adolescent daily hassles and the mother-child relationship each had the strongest direct effects on adolescent behavior problems at two different time points in a complex, family-level structural equation model (Aroian, Templin, Hough, Ramaswamy, & Katz, ).

Tardif and Geva’s () study on a sample of Chinese Canadian immigrant mother!adolescent dyads, for example, showed that accultura-tion disparity was associated with reports of more conflicts. This is consistent with reports from the   Aumer says her Chinese mother never says things like, “Congratulations”, or, “I am proud of you”, but her American father says things like, “Good job, honey”.

Zhang Yuping, from China and the mother of a year-old boy and 9-year-old daughter, says that when she receives her children’s course results she tends to concentrate on Adolescent-parent conflict was examined in lower-class Chinese early, mid- and late adolescents in Hong Kong.

Individually interviewed adolescents described actual family conflicts, rated While some studies have supported the conceptual models developed to explain how conflict may result from parent–adolescent acculturation gaps within immigrant families, others have produced contradictory findings.

Therefore, the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model may be a step toward explaining the discrepancies in the field. It is a model for dyadic data ://   Acculturation can profoundly influence the way parent-child relationships are expressed in immigrant families.

Acculturation refers to the culture change that occurs when immigrants settle in a host culture (Schwartz, Unger, Zamboanga, & Szapocznik, ).Within immigrant families, parents’ acculturation levels can influence their parenting ://   Associate Professor, Ph.D.

(University of Toronto) Office: CRN x [email protected] Tardif-Williams is a developmental psychologist whose main research interests include the social emotional development of children and youth within the context of family relationships.

Specifically, (). The Link between Acculturation Disparity and Conflict among Chinese Canadian Immigrant Mother-Adolescent Dyads. The Link Between the Pursuit of Intimacy Goals and Satisfaction in Close Relationships: An Examination of the Underlying Processes.

Anna Lichtwarck-Aschoff, Saskia Kunnen, Paul van Geert, Adolescent Girls’ Perceptions of Daily Conflicts With Their Mothers: Within-Conflict Sequences and Their Relationship to Autonomy, Journal of Adolescent Research, /, 25, 4, (), ().

Hana-May Eadeh, Elizaveta Bourchtein, Joshua M. Langberg, Laura D. Eddy, Lauren Oddo, Stephen J. Molitor, Steven W. Evans, Longitudinal Evaluation of the Role of Academic and Social Impairment and Parent-Adolescent Conflict in the Development of Depression in Adolescents with ADHD, Journal of Child and Family Studies, /s Parent-child acculturation discrepancy is a risk factor in the development of children in immigrant families.

Using a longitudinal sample of Chinese immigrant families, the current study examined how unsupportive parenting and parent-child sense of alienation sequentially mediate the relationship between parent-child acculturation discrepancy and child adjustment during early and middle The acculturation gap-distress model purports that immigrant children acculturate to their new culture at a quicker pace than their parents, leading to family conflict and youth maladjustment.

This article reviews literature on the acculturation gap-distress model, showing that acculturation gaps function in unique ways depending on many social and.

Traditional Chinese parenting has one clear advantage over contemporary Western parenting: Chinese parents--like many other Asian parents--are more likely to emphasize effort over innate talent.

Experiments show that people learn more when they believe that effort, not innate intelligence, is The relations between parent and child acculturation and family and child adjustment were examined among 91 immigrant Chinese families in Canada with early adolescents (average age of 12).

Acculturation was assessed in public (e.g., language use) and private (e.g., values) domains separately in Chinese and Canadian cultures. With one exception, interactions between parent and child Parent–child acculturation discrepancy is a risk factor in the development of children in immigrant families.

Using a longitudinal sample of Chinese immigrant families, the authors of the current study examined how unsupportive parenting and parent–child sense of alienation sequentially mediate the relationship between parent–child acculturation discrepancy and child adjustment during ?doi=/a